Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Historic Renovations: La Pointe Krebs House

Reclaimed, antique heart pine beams supplied for historic renovation in Mississippi.


(Above) Reclaimed antique pine beams lay in front of the Le Pointe Krebs House in Pascagoula, MS. 

Albany Woodworks once again received the opportunity to work with contractor, JO Collins, on their most recent historic renovation. With years of experience in antique woods and a reputation of quality, Albany Woodworks has provided reclaimed, antique building materials and flooring to several historic renovations across the US. The La Pointe Krebs House is no different. To meet historically accurate standards for the restoration, Albany Woodworks has worked tirelessly with the architect and contractor to ensure that all materials supplied are up to par. Going so far as to match sawmarks authentically that would have been created by hand sawing in the 1700's. 

(Above) The layout of the La Pointe Krebs house. 

The La Pointe Krebs House in Pascagoula, MS is a landmark of some importance. It has been confirmed to be the oldest house in the Mississippi River Valley. The original structure was a one room home built in 1757. An addition was added in 1770 and another in 1790. Part of what makes La Pointe Krebs house so special is the variety of historic building techniques that can be seen in the house. The original structure was built using Tabby Concrete, a mix of oyster shells and concrete. The other additions were built with Bousillage, a mixture of clay, animal bones, pottery fragments and Spanish moss. It acted as a museum for many years until it became a victim of Hurricane Katrina.


(Above) Original beams like the ones pictured above the window here are being replaced with beams of the same look, quality and craftsmanship like those framing the window. 

Now JO Collins and Albany Woodworks are working diligently to get this historic landmark back up and running. The task is full of obstacles as well. Part of the foundation has sunk and is being raised a considerable distance in order to level the house again. Steel beams and jacks were used to raise the walls of the house to rebuild the foundation. However, every detail counts. The steel beams can not be bolted directly into the home due to historic preservation issues; along with other countless challenges of similar nature.


(Above) A view of the steel beams and jacks used to hold up the walls of the structure. 

But there is no doubt that this historic renovation will be a success like all others. And soon, the doors of La Pointe Krebs also known as the Old Spanish Fort will once again open, allowing residents and visitors to appreciate the unique features and history of this landmark.